Party at the Beehive!

Party at the Beehive!

beecrowd announced today, October 3rd 2023, the receival of its first external investment: a USD 1 million seed funding. The startup, which is less than 2 years old, is already the largest community of developers in LATAM and ranks among the largest in the world. Headquartered in São Paulo, Brazil, the company was founded by 3 technology executives and 2 academic researchers with the goal of promoting the adoption of alternative forms of training, tech talent recruitment, and corporate work aligned with the principles of the future of work.

beecrowd is a community-driven professional services digital platform. The company empowers tech students and professionals, connecting them with the most innovative corporations worldwide to facilitate talent deployment solutions. With nearly 900,000 users across 100 countries, the largest communities of "beecrowders" are currently located in Brazil, Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Mexico, Indonesia, Argentina, Colombia, the United States, and the Arab world.

Beecrowders, as the tech talent using the platform are known, are top-tier software developers assessed and ranked through rigorous evaluations. The company's state-of-the-art competitive programming platform offers over 2,400 analytical and programming tests in 27 different programming languages. As beecrowders train and compete, they enhance their logical and programming skills, achieve higher rankings, and accelerate their journeys to the top. The highest-ranked beecrowders are professionally disputed by the most innovative global corporations.

The startup is poised for its next growth phase in its journey to become one of the world's largest and most significant platforms for professional and technology services. According to João Lúcio de Azevedo Filho, CEO and co-founder of the company, beecrowd is well-positioned to achieve its goals not only due to its innovative strategy but also because it incorporates a strong ESG component in it: the beecrowd platform is currently used free of charge by over 220,000 students from 660 educational institutions in 47 countries, generating positive impacts on communities and contributing to building a fairer world with more opportunities.

The resources from the investment will primarily be used to strengthen the company's internal team (careers), implement new features on the beecrowd platform, enhance user experience, and introduce the new B2B area of the platform in the coming months.

João Lúcio adds: "On behalf of our founders and collaborators, I thank all the users, companies, professors, educational institutions, foundations, partners, and communities that support us and believe in beecrowd. This significant milestone gives us even more confidence and energy to keep moving forward, integrating the future of work into our clients' experiences and changing the way the world works."

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(beecrowd co-founders) From left to right and from top to bottom: João Lúcio, Celso Barboza, Neilor Tonin, Juliana Müller and Jean Bez
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C#

C#

(9 minutes read)

C# (C Sharp) is one of the most important and requested languages nowadays.

It is one of the three main programming technologies that use the letter “C” as a representation (the other two are C and C++). And as much as they are similar in some respects, they have differences between them.

C# (C sharp) is an object-oriented programming language developed by Microsoft as part of its .NET platform. Since its release in the early 2000s, C# has become one of the most popular and widely used programming languages around the world.


FEATURES OF C#

Object Orientation: Like Java and C++, C# is an object-oriented programming language . This allows programmers to define and manipulate data as entity objects that combine state (attributes) and behavior (methods).

Static Typing: C# is a statically typed language, which means that the types of variables are defined at compile time and cannot be changed at run time.

Interoperability: C# offers excellent interoperability with other programming languages that run on the .NET platform. This is extremely useful for projects that need integration with legacy code or third-party libraries.

Rich Set of Libraries: The .NET Framework, and more recently .NET Core and .NET 5 (and subsequent versions), offer a vast set of standard libraries that facilitate application development in many areas, from web development to computer science. data.

Cross Platform: With the release of .NET Core, C# expanded its presence beyond Windows. It is now possible to run C# applications on operating systems such as Linux and MacOS.

Modern Development: C# has continued to evolve over the years, adopting the best features and patterns from other languages as well as introducing its own innovations. Features like LINQ, lambda expressions, and async / await have made the language more expressive and powerful.


C# APPLICATIONS

Given its versatility, C# is used in a wide variety of applications. Below we list the most important ones:

Web Development: With ASP.NET, C# is a popular choice for developing websites, web applications and APIs.

Desktop Applications: From traditional Windows apps to modern Windows Store apps, C# is a leading choice for desktop development.

Game Development: Through Unity, one of the most popular game engines in the world, C# has become a fundamental language in video game development.

Mobile Apps: With tools like Xamarin, developers can use C# to build native mobile apps for Android, iOS, and Windows.

Cloud Applications: With Azure, Microsoft's cloud platform, C# is often used to develop and host scalable applications in the cloud.


WHY LEARN C#?

Learning C# is a strategic choice for many programmers and aspiring developers for several powerful reasons. Here are some reasons why C# is a valuable programming language to learn:

.NET Platform: The .NET platform, especially with the release of .NET Core and .NET 5 (and subsequent versions), has become cross-platform, meaning that code can run on Windows, Linux, and MacOS. This greatly expands the reach of C#.

Performance and Security: .NET applications are known for their reliable performance and robust security features.

Continuous Innovation: The C# language is constantly evolving, with Microsoft regularly adding new features and functionality, making it modern and current.

Support and Community: A large global developer community and vast number of online resources (such as tutorials, forums, and documentation) ensure support for those learning or developing in C#.

Career Opportunities: Due to the widespread adoption of C# in many industries, there is a constant demand for proficient C# developers. This translates to job opportunities and career growth.

Interoperability: C# offers excellent interoperability, allowing developers to easily work with code from other languages.

Development Tools: Visual Studio, from Microsoft, is one of the IDEs is the most advanced and feature-rich environment available, providing a powerful development environment for C# developers.

Azure Ecosystem: With the growing popularity of Microsoft Azure as a cloud platform, knowledge of C# is especially beneficial for developing and implementing cloud solutions.

Learning Curve: For those who are already familiar with languages like Java or C++, the transition to C# can be smoother as many of the concepts and syntax are similar.


MAIN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN C, C++, and EC#

C, C++, and C# are three distinct programming languages, each with their own characteristics, histories, and uses. Here is a general comparison between them:


C LANGUAGE

It was created in the 1970s. It is one of the oldest programming languages and is still widely used.

It is a procedural language and provides low- level access to hardware. This makes C particularly powerful for developing systems and applications that require high performance.

It is widely used in the development of operating systems, device drivers, and applications that demand performance and direct control over the hardware.


C++ LANGUAGE

C++ was created by Bjarne Stroustrup in the 1980s as an extension of C.

It incorporates object-oriented programming elements, which allow the creation of classes and objects. However, it still retains the procedural programming capability of C and can be used in both styles. It also adds a rich standard library known as STL (Standard Template Library).

It is used in applications that require high performance, such as games, simulations, and systems development.


MAIN DIFFERENCES

Paradigm: While C is primarily a procedural language, C++ adds support for object-oriented programming and C# is primarily object-oriented but also supports functional programming and components.

Platform and Runtime Environment: C and C++ are generally compiled to native operating system code. C#, on the other hand, is generally compiled for Common Intermediate Language (CIL), which is then interpreted or just - in-time compiled to native code by the .NET runtime.

Developer and Ecosystem: C and C++ are more "universal" languages without a single main developer, while C# is strongly associated with Microsoft and its ecosystem.


CONCLUSION

In summary, C# is a robust, modern, and constantly evolving programming language, remaining relevant and indispensable in today's IT landscape. Whether you're an experienced developer or someone looking to break into the world of programming, C# is an excellent option to consider.

Learning C# opens doors to a wide range of applications and opportunities. Whether you're someone looking to take up a new game development hobby or a professional looking to diversify your skills, C# is a solid and worthwhile choice.


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Apache Cordova

Apache Cordova

(9 minutes of reading)


In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the demand for mobile apps, both for Android and iOS devices. However, developing native apps for each of these platforms can be a laborious and time-consuming process.

It was in this context that Apache Cordova emerged as an effective solution for cross-platform mobile application development.

In this article, we'll explore what Apache Cordova is, its history, features, benefits, and usage examples.


WHAT IS APACHE CORDOVA?

Apache Cordova, formerly known as PhoneGap, is an open-source mobile application development framework.

The framework allows you to create mobile applications using standard web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript and package them in native containers for different mobile platforms such as Android, iOS, and Windows Phone.

With Cordova, developers can build applications once and deploy them to multiple platforms, avoiding the need to develop the same application multiple times for each specific platform.


HISTORY OF APACHE CORDOVA

The history of Apache Cordova dates to the launch of PhoneGap by Nitobi Software in 2008.

At that time, mobile app development was still in its early stages, and most apps were developed natively for each platform, which required knowledge in different programming languages and specific APIs.

PhoneGap was launched as a solution to this problem, allowing developers to use standard web technologies such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create cross-platform mobile apps.

PhoneGap's innovative approach soon caught the attention of the developer community and quickly gained popularity.

In 2011, Adobe Systems acquired PhoneGap and integrated it into its product suite. Adobe saw the potential of PhoneGap to facilitate cross-platform mobile app development and expand its reach into the developer community.

However, to promote the project's open governance and collaboration, Adobe decided to donate PhoneGap to the Apache Software Foundation in 2011. The project was accepted and renamed Apache Cordova, in reference to a famous geographical location in Spain called Cordova.

This transfer to the Apache Software Foundation was significant as Cordova became an open-source project, under the Apache license, and developed and maintained by the community.

This allowed developers from all over the world to contribute to the continuous improvement of the framework and share their knowledge and resources.

Since then, Apache Cordova has continued to evolve and attract an active community of developers, with regular releases and significant enhancements.

The Cordova community works closely to add features, fix bugs, and keep the framework up to date with the latest trends and market requirements.


FEATURES OF APACHE CORDOVA

As we can see, Apache Cordova is an open-source mobile application development framework.

Whether you're building a simple application or a complex one with advanced functionality, Apache Cordova provides a variety of tools and features that make the process easier and more efficient.

From its robust plug-in architecture to its ability to seamlessly support multiple platforms, there are many reasons why Apache Cordova has become the preferred choice of many application developers around the world.

Next, we'll explore the main features of Apache Cordova and how they can benefit application developers.


A) DEVELOPMENT BASED ON WEB TECHNOLOGY

Cordova allows developers to use existing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript skills to build mobile apps, without needing to learn native programming languages.

This is especially beneficial for web developers who want to expand into mobile development.


B) ACCESS TO NATIVE RESOURCES

Although Cordova apps are based on web technologies, they have access to native device features such as camera, accelerometer, contacts, and more through JavaScript APIs provided by Cordova.

This capability allows applications developed with Cordova to have functionality like native applications.


C) MULTIPLATFORM DEPLOYMENT

With Cordova, you can build a single app and deploy it to multiple mobile platforms, saving development time and effort. This means that developers can reach a wider audience without having to rewrite application code for each specific platform.


D) EXTENSIBILITY

Cordova allows you to extend the functionality of the application through plugins. There are plugins available for a wide range of features like push notifications, geolocation, local storage, and integration with popular services.

Developers can also create their own plugins to meet specific application needs.


BENEFITS OF APACHE CORDOVA

Apache Cordova offers several significant benefits for mobile application developers.

Below are some of the main benefits of Cordova:


1) EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENT

Cordova allows developers to quickly build mobile apps using their skills in web technologies.

Instead of learning native programming languages and developing separate apps for each platform, they can focus on creating a consistent, high-quality experience using the technologies they already know. This reduces development time and associated costs.


2) CODE REUSE

With Cordova, you can write code once and use it on multiple mobile platforms. This reduces duplication of effort and makes the application easier to maintain.

Developers can create a common codebase and implement the necessary customizations for each specific platform.

This not only saves time, but also makes it easier to fix bugs and add new features.


3) ACCESS TO NATIVE RESOURCES

Although Cordova apps are based on web technologies, they have access to native device capabilities.

This allows you to create feature-rich applications that take advantage of the capabilities of mobile devices. For example, a camera app built with Cordova can use the native camera API to take photos, access the photo gallery, and apply filters.

This provides a more immersive and native user experience, even if the application is built using web technologies.


4) ACTIVE COMMUNITY

Cordova is an open-source project with an active community of developers. This means that there are many resources available, such as documentation, tutorials, and plugins, as well as community support.

The Cordova community is engaged and collaborative, sharing knowledge, solving problems, and keeping the framework up to date. This makes Cordova a reliable choice for mobile app development.


EXAMPLES OF USE OF APACHE CORDOVA

Cordova has been used in a variety of popular mobile applications. Some notable examples include:

Untappd: An app for beer lovers that lets you discover, rate, and share beers with friends. Untappd is built with Cordova to provide cross-platform experience and access features such as geolocation, camera, and push notifications.

FanReact: An app that allows sports fans to interact during games, share photos and videos, and earn points. FanReact leverages Cordova to create a consistent experience across platforms and leverage native features such as camera and geolocation.

TripCase: A travel management app that helps travelers organize itineraries, receive flight alerts, and share information with other travelers. TripCase uses Cordova to develop a cross-platform application that integrates with airline and hotel services, offering a complete experience for users.


CONCLUSION

Apache Cordova is a powerful solution for cross-platform mobile application development. Based on standard web technologies, it allows developers to build applications using existing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript skills.

With the ability to access native device capabilities and deploy across multiple platforms, Cordova provides efficiency, code reuse, and access to an active community of developers. If you're looking to efficiently develop cross-platform mobile apps, Apache Cordova is a technology to consider.

With Cordova, you can take full advantage of web technologies to create feature-rich applications that can be deployed across platforms, reaching a wider audience and reducing development time and costs.

Therefore, Cordova is a solid choice for developers who want to build high-quality and efficient mobile apps.


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API

API

(8 minutes of reading)


API is an acronym for Application Programming Interface. APIs is a set of tools, definitions, and protocols for creating software applications. APIs connect solutions and services, without the need to know how those elements were implemented.

It is almost impossible nowadays, that a programmer is not aware of what APIs are and how to work with them, as they help to be more efficient, generating less work and more productivity for consumers and companies.

In this text, we will talk about APIs, how they are present in our work routine and how they are used to improve the systems functionality. Come read!


WHAT IS AN API?

As already mentioned, API means Application Programming Interface. It is a set of protocols, routines and tools for building software applications that specify how these software components should interact with each other. Quite simply, an API is a way for different programs to communicate and exchange information.

APIs can allow different systems to work together seamlessly. For example, an e-commerce site might use an API to communicate with a payment processing system to facilitate customer payments. Likewise, a mobile app can use an API to interact with a social media platform to allow users to share content on their social media profiles.

APIs are built using different programming languages and technologies and can be designed for a variety of purposes. APIs can be: Public or Private, that is, they can be available to anyone or restricted to specific users or applications.


HISTORY

The concept of APIs has been around since the beginning of computing, but like everything else in technology, their evolution and use has been driven by technological advances and changing business needs.

Initially APIs were used as low-level interfaces to access system resources such as memory and hardware devices. With the evolution of computing and networking, APIs needed to evolve to support high-level functionality, such as accessing databases, communicating between applications, and exchanging data over the Internet.

One of the first APIs to gain widespread adoption was the Common Gateway Interface (CGI), it was used as a way for web servers to run programs and generate dynamic content. Another point that helped the growth of the API was the introduction of XML which provided a standardized way of describing and exchanging data between applications.

With the rise of the web and the emergence of mobile devices, there was an even more accelerated growth of APIs, as companies began to have the need to have web-based mobile applications that could integrate with other systems and services.

With the development of REST APIs we have a lightweight and flexible approach to building APIs, which has become one of the dominant approaches to API development today.

APIs today are a critical component of modern software development, enabling companies to build and integrate applications and services faster and more efficiently. The growth of cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) will further aid the growth and evolution of APIs.


HOW IT WORKS?

APIs work by specifying a set of rules and standards that define how software components should interact with each other. Typically, an API defines the types of requests that can be made to it, the format of the data that must be exchanged, and the actions or responses that must occur because of those requests.

The moment a software component wants to interact with an API, it makes a request to the API using a specific syntax or programming language. The API then interprets the request, validates it, and performs the necessary actions to produce a response. This response is usually in a predefined format such as JSON or XML and has the data or information requested by the component making the request.

A good example might be Google Maps or a weather forecast API that provides information about the weather in different places. A mobile app or a website can make a request to the weather API using a specific syntax or programming language. The API then retrieves the requested weather information from a database or other source, validates the request, and sends back the requested information in a predefined format such as JSON or XML. The software component can then use this information to display the weather forecast to the user.

APIs can also provide a way for software components to interact with each other in real time, allowing for dynamic and seamless integration between different systems.


BENEFITS

Here we list the main advantages of using APIs.


1) Perfect integration: with APIs it is possible for different systems to integrate, allowing data and functionalities to be shared between different applications.

2) Speed and efficiency: APIs streamline communication between software components, reducing the time and effort required to perform complex tasks.

3) Reusability: APIs can be reused across multiple applications, allowing for greater flexibility and scalability.

4) Standardization: With APIs it is possible to standardize communication between different systems, making it easier for developers to create and maintain software applications.

5) Security: APIs provide secure access to data and functionality, allowing controlled access to confidential information.

6) Innovation: APIs allow developers to create new and innovative applications leveraging the functionality of existing software components.

7) Monetization: APIs can be monetized by developers and companies, allowing them to generate revenue by providing access to their data and functionality to other applications and systems.


Overall, APIs provide a powerful and flexible way to integrate software systems, allowing for greater efficiency, innovation, and scalability.


API TYPES

The main types of APIs are:


1) REST APIs: REST (Representational State Transfer) APIs are web APIs that use HTTP requests to access and manipulate resources, such as data, on a server. They are generally designed to be stateless, meaning that each request contains all the information needed to complete it.

2) SOAP APIs: SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) APIs are Web APIs that use XML-based messages to exchange data between applications. SOAP APIs are designed to be more structured and require a dedicated message format.

3) GraphQL: GraphQL APIs are newer APIs that use a query language to allow clients to specify the exact data they need, receiving only the requested information. Thus, resulting in more efficient data recovery and improved performance.

4) RPC APIs: RPC (Remote Procedure Call) APIs are APIs that allow a client to call a function or procedure on a remote server and receive a response. RPC APIs can be synchronous or asynchronous and can use a variety of transport protocols such as HTTP or TCP.

5) WebSockets: WebSockets are APIs that provide a bidirectional full-duplex communication channel between a client and a server. WebSockets are typically used for real-time applications such as chat rooms or online games.

6) Libraries and SDKs: Libraries and SDKs (Software Development Kits) are sets of software tools and resources that provide an interface for developers to access the functionality of a specific system or service. They are often used to simplify the integration process with third-party services like social media platforms or payment gateways.


In general, the choice of API type will depend on the specific requirements and constraints of the project or application being developed.


API AND INNOVATION

APIs are a powerful tool for innovation, as developers can leverage existing data and functionality in innovative ways. By building on the APIs, you can create new applications and services that add value to users and customers.

APIs allow for faster and more efficient development, as they provide pre-built functionality and data, and help developers reduce the amount of code they need to write by speeding up the development process.

With APIs, developers can test and iterate faster, as APIs help test and refine ideas in a more realistic environment and make changes and improvements based on user feedback and data.

APIs also enable collaboration and partnerships between companies and developers. By making their APIs available to third-party developers, companies can create new opportunities for innovation and collaboration and tap into new markets and customer bases.

Overall, APIs can be a powerful tool for innovation, allowing developers to create new and innovative applications and services, while also enabling collaboration and partnerships between companies and developers.


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Kubernetes

Kubernetes

(12 minutes of reading)


Kubernetes, commonly stylized as K8s, is an open source, portable, and extensible platform that automates the deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, making it easy to both declaratively configure and automate. It has a large and fast-growing ecosystem.

The name Kubernetes has a Greek origin and means helmsman or pilot . K8s is the abbreviation derived by replacing the eight letters "ubernete" with "8", becoming K"8"s .

Kubernetes was originally designed by Google which was one of the pioneers in the development of Linux container technology. Google has already publicly revealed that everything at the company runs in containers.

Today Kubernetes is maintained by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

Kubernetes works with a variety of containerization tools, including Docker.

Many cloud services offer a Service-based platform (PaaS or IaaS) where Kubernetes can be deployed under a managed service. Many vendors also provide their own brand of Kubernetes distribution.

But before we talk about containerized applications, let's go back in time a bit and see what these implementations looked like before.


HISTORY OF IMPLEMENTATIONS

Let's go back in time a bit to understand why Kubernetes is so important today.


TRADITIONAL IMPLEMENTATION

A few years ago, applications were running on physical servers and, therefore, it was not possible to define resource limits for applications on the same physical server, which caused resource allocation problems.


VIRTUALIZED DEPLOYMENT

To solve the problems of the physical server, the virtualization solution was implemented, which allowed the execution of several virtual machines (VMs) on a single CPU of a physical server. Virtualization allowed applications to be isolated between VMs, providing a higher level of security, as information from an application cannot be freely accessed by other applications.

With virtualization it was possible to improve the use of resources on a physical server, having better scalability since an application can be added or updated easily while achieving hardware cost reduction.


IMPLEMENTATION IN CONTAINERS

Containers are very similar to VMs, but one of the big differences is that they have flexible isolation properties to share the operating system (OS) between applications. So, they are considered lightweight.

Like the VM, a container has its own file system, CPU share, memory, process space, and more. Because they are separate from the underlying infrastructure, they are portable across clouds and operating system distributions.


CLUSTER IN KUBERNETES – WHAT ARE THEY?

As mentioned before, K8s is an open-source project that aims to orchestrate containers and automate application deployment. Kubernetes manages the clusters that contain the hosts that run Linux applications.

Clusters can include spanning hosts in on-premises, public, private, or hybrid clouds, so Kubernetes is the ideal platform for hosting cloud-native applications that require rapid scalability, such as streaming real-time data through Apache Kafka.

In Kubernetes, the state of the cluster is defined by the user, and it is up to the orchestration service to reach and maintain the desired state, within the limitations imposed by the user. We can understand Kubernetes as divided into two planes: the control plane, which performs the global orchestration of the system, and the data plane, where the containers reside.

If you want to group hosts running in Linux®(LXC) containers into clusters, Kubernetes helps you manage them easily and efficiently and at scale.

With Kubernetes, it eliminates many manual processes that an application in containers requires, facilitating and streamlining projects.


ADVANTAGES OF KUBERNETES

Using Kubernetes makes it easy to deploy and fully rely on a container-based infrastructure for production environments. As the purpose of Kubernetes is to completely automate operational tasks, you do the same tasks that other management systems or application platforms allow, but for your containers.

With Kubernetes, you can also build cloud-native apps as a runtime platform. Just use the Kubernetes standards, which are the necessary tools for the programmer to create container-based services and applications.

Here are other tips on what is possible with Kubernetes:

- Orchestrate containers across multiple hosts.

- Maximize the resources needed to run enterprise apps.

- Control and automate application updates and deployments.

- Enable and add storage to run stateful apps.

- Scale containerized applications and the corresponding resources quickly.

- Manage services more assertively so that the implementation of deployed applications always occurs as expected.

- Self-heal and health check apps by automating placement, restart, replication, and scaling.


Kubernetes relies on other open-source projects to develop this orchestrated work.

Here are some of the features:


- Registry using projects like Docker Registry.

- Network using projects like OpenvSwitch and edge routing.

- Telemetry using projects like Kibana and Hawkular.

- Security using projects like LDAP and SELinux with multi-tenancy layers.

- Automation with the addition of Ansible playbook for installation and cluster lifecycle management.

- Services using a vast catalog of popular app patterns.


KUBERNETES COMMON TERMS

Every technology has a specific language, and this makes life very difficult for developers. So, here are some of the more common terms in Kubernetes to help you understand better:

1) Control plane: set of processes that controls Kubernetes nodes. It is the source of all task assignments.

2) Node: they are the ones who carry out the tasks requested and assigned by the control plane.

3) Pod: A group of one or more containers deployed on a node. All containers in a pod have the same IP address, IPC, hostname, and other resources. Pods abstract networking and storage from the underlying container. This makes moving containers around the cluster easier.

4) Replication controller: he is the one who controls how many identical copies of a pod should run at a given location in the cluster.

5) Service: Decouples job definitions from pods. Kubernetes service proxies automatically receive requests to the right pod, no matter where it goes in the cluster or if it has been replaced.

6) Kubelet: is a service that runs on nodes, reads the container manifests, and starts and runs the defined containers.

7) Kubectl: The Kubernetes command-line configuration tool.


HOW DOES KUBERNETES WORK?

After we talk about the most used terms in Kubernetes, let's talk about how it works.

Cluster is the working Kubernetes deployment. The cluster is divided into two parts: the control plane and the node, with each node having its own physical or virtual Linux® environment. Nodes run pods that are made up of containers. The control plane is responsible for maintaining the desired state of the cluster. The computing machines run the applications and workloads.

Kubernetes runs on an operating system such as Red Hat® Enterprise Linux and interacts with container pods running on nodes.

The Kubernetes control plane accepts commands from an administrator (or DevOps team) and relays those instructions to the computing machines. This relay is performed in conjunction with various services to automatically decide which node is best suited for the task. Then, resources are allocated, and node pods assigned to fulfill the requested task.

The Kubernetes cluster state defines which applications or workloads will run, as well as the images they will use, the resources made available to them, and other configuration details.

Control over containers happens at a higher level which makes it more refined and without the need to micromanage each container or node separately. That is, you only need to configure Kubernetes and define the nodes, pods and containers present in them, as Kubernetes does all the orchestration of the containers by itself.

The Kubernetes runtime environment is chosen by the programmer. It can be bare-metal server, public cloud, virtual machines, and private and hybrid clouds. That is, Kubernetes works in many types of infrastructure.

We can also use Docker as a container runtime orchestrated by Kubernetes. When Kubernetes schedules a pod for a node, the kubelet on the node instructs Docker to start the specified containers. So, the kubelet collects the status of Docker containers and aggregates information in the control plane continuously. Docker then places the containers on that node and starts and stops them as normal.

The main difference when using Kubernetes with Docker is that an automated system requests Docker perform these tasks on all nodes of all containers, instead of the administrator making these requests manually.

Most on-premises Kubernetes deployments run on a virtual infrastructure, with an increasing number of deployments on bare-metal servers. In this way, Kubernetes works as a tool for managing the lifecycle and deployment of containerized applications.

That way you get more public cloud agility and on-premises simplicity to reduce developer headaches in IT operations. The cost-benefit is higher, as an additional hypervisor layer is not required to run the VMs. It has more development flexibility to deploy containers, serverless applications and Kubernetes VMs, scaling applications and infrastructures. And lastly, hybrid cloud extensibility with Kubernetes as the common layer across public clouds and on-premises.


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Go Programming Language

Go Programming Language

(7 minutes of reading)


Go programming language is an open-source language that has quickly become one of the most popular languages for software development.

Developed by Google in 2009, Go is a statically typed language that focuses on concurrency and speed.

It was designed to be a simple yet powerful language that can be used for a wide range of applications, from web services to systems programming.

Next, we'll discuss Go's features and advantages, its relationship to other popular languages, and how it can be used in web development.


WHAT IS GO?

Go is a powerful open-source programming language created by Google.

It is an incredibly versatile language that has been used to develop applications ranging from software engineering tools and operating systems to web servers and mobile applications.

Go is ideal for building highly scalable, highly concurrent distributed systems efficiently.

The advantages of using the Go language are many.

First, the language offers great flexibility, allowing developers to quickly prototype code with minimal installation or configuration.

It also has built-in concurrency support for multi-threaded development, making it easy to create programs that can effectively handle large amounts of data in parallel.

As a statically typed language, Go provides greater speed and security than dynamic typed languages like Python or JavaScript due to its compile-time type safety checks.


GO: HOW AND WHY WAS THE LANGUAGE CREATED?

Go is a relatively new programming language developed by Google in 2009.

It quickly became one of the most popular languages used to develop software, mainly due to its simplicity and ease of use.

It is an open-source language that can be used on all platforms including Windows, MacOS and Linux.

Go's goal was to provide developers with a language that would allow them to build programs faster than other languages by simplifying common tasks such as memory management and garbage collection.

In addition, it provides high levels of concurrency, which allows developers to easily build distributed systems, services, and applications.

It also has great performance due to its lightweight design, and also because of the powerful built-in tools for debugging.

Overall, Go has become popular because it offers developers an easy way to start their projects with minimal effort compared to other languages like C++ or Java.


HOW GO COMPARE WITH OTHER PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

As we said, Go is a language that has been gaining more and more traction in the software development community in recent years.

But how does a relatively new language like Go compare to other, more established languages? In this topic, we'll look at how Go compares to some of the most popular languages available today, such as Java, C++, and Python.


PYTHON

Python is one of the most popular programming languages today.

The language has a wide range of applications, from web development to artificial intelligence. But what happens when we compare Go and Python?

Go offers a simpler syntax than its predecessors, which makes it easier for new developers to learn quickly.

Go also has built-in garbage collection, statically typed, and high performance compared to Python and other languages.

Furthermore, its concurrency framework allows developers to create programs that can use multiple processors simultaneously for maximum efficiency.

Additionally, Go's runtime system compiles code into machine code before execution, rather than relying on an interpreter like Python.


JAVA

Java is one of the most popular programming languages and has been around since 1995. It is used to develop applications for a variety of systems and platforms, including mobile devices, web-based applications, desktop programs and much more.

However, when we compare the programming language with Go, we can see that the language created by Google has a syntax similar to C++, but offers modern features such as garbage collection, memory security and support for concurrent programming.

Furthermore, Go is also optimized for performance compared to Java; however, its lack of features may make it less suitable for complicated projects that require scalability and flexibility.


C++

Go vs C++ is an important debate in the programming world.

Go, developed by Google in 2009, is a modern language that has gained popularity in recent years. It has been praised for its beginner-friendly syntax and increased productivity due to its simple yet powerful features.

On the other hand, C++ is an older language that has been around since 1985 and remains one of the most popular languages used today.

C++ offers more control over memory management than Go and allows for higher performance applications and improved code readability through the use of stronger typing rules.

Ultimately, both languages have their advantages and disadvantages regarding performance, usability, scalability, and maintainability, so it's important to weigh all factors when deciding which one will best suit your project.


GO BENEFITS

Go language is one of the most popular programming languages currently in use.

With its concurrency model, fast compile time, and intuitive syntax, Go offers numerous advantages over other languages.

The language combines the speed of a compiled language with the ease and flexibility of a scripting language, making it suitable for many development scenarios.

Go has become increasingly popular due to its efficiency and versatility, making it an attractive choice for developers looking for a robust solution. Here are some of the advantages of using Go:

1) Go's syntax is simple and straightforward, allowing developers to quickly learn and understand the fundamentals. This facilitates program development without the need to learn advanced concepts such as object-oriented or generic programming.

2) Go code can be read easily even after long periods of time away from development work as every line is clear.

3) Debugging in Go is easy as bugs are reported quickly and accurately so they can be fixed quickly with minimal effort.


DISADVANTAGES

The Go language can be used for a variety of tasks, but like any other technology, it also has some drawbacks.

One of the most prominent issues associated with the Go language is the lack of certain features compared to other languages.

For example, Go has no generics; this means that developers have to write multiple versions of the same program for different data types, rather than creating a generic version that works for all data types.

Additionally, the lack of integration tools and libraries within Go makes complex application development difficult and time-consuming.

While Go has made strides in recent years to address these shortcomings, they remain a major concern among developers wanting to use this language in their projects.


The beecrowd platform supports the Go language! Take this opportunity to practice a lot!


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HTML5 and CSS3

HTML5 and CSS3

(7 minutes of reading)


In 1991, Tim Berners-Lee designed HTML to make sharing documents easier and faster. With the creation of the World Wide Web, HTML became a tool used by everyone and everything.

As a result of the growth of HTML, CSS emerged, because the more HTML was used, the more developers used their creativity to make pages beautiful and stylish. However, all this aesthetic part was written in the same file as the structural part, making them gigantic and increasingly difficult to understand. Thus, in 1995, CSS was created to deal with the aesthetic part of the page, separately from the structure, that is, the role of HTML.


HTML

Its name comes from the English Hyper Text Markup Language, which means that HTML is not considered a programming language.

Imagine a web page, like the one on our blog that you are reading now. It is possible to notice that there are several separate elements, such as header, title, paragraphs, images, and many others. The entire organization of these elements is done by HTML. It is used to create the entire structure of the page, and, for that, it uses the famous tags to define where each type of element will be implemented.

For example, if you want to insert a paragraph on the screen, you can use the <p></p> tag for that, placing the desired text inside the element, as shown below:


<p>This is a paragraph</p>


In short, we can say that there are several tags of different structures to assemble the skeleton of the page.

HTML5 is an improved version of the original HTML standard (if you want to know more about HTML5 read this other article on our blog).

HTML5 was developed to meet the increasing demands presented by today's media, cross -device and mobile internet needs. It is an excellent tool for cross-platform mobile application development because many of its features have been adapted with consideration for access on low-powered devices, including Tablets and Smartphones.

HTML5 provides a common interface to make loading components simpler. For example, HTML5 does not require the Flash plugin because the element will run on its own.


HTML5

As stated earlier, HTML5 is the latest version of the markup language used to create websites. Although it is very similar to the previous versions, it has some new features that are super handy.

Below are the main benefits of HTML5:

- HTML5 has video and audio playback. In previous versions, developers were required to use third-party programs to play videos and audios. This ended up causing a lot of errors. HTML5 solved this problem with full support for video and audio.

- HTML5 offers offline caching, so visitors can load certain elements on a web page without an active internet connection (but they must have accessed the site before). If a visitor's internet connection is low, they can still load the main elements of the site.

Now, how is it possible to make this paragraph colored? Or change the font of the letter? That's where our next technology comes in: CSS.


CSS

Cascading style Sheet, better known as CSS, is a styling language that, like HTML, is not considered a programming language. It is responsible for separating the structural part of the application (which will be in the hands of HTML) from the aesthetic part. To use CSS, we use the following syntax:


strong {
	color: blue;
}

h1 {
	font-style : italic ;
}


The selector will be the element we are going to style (it can be a tag, a class, an identifier, etc.), the property is what we want to change (color, font-size, width, etc.) and the value is the change to be made done.

When using an HTML tag, like the one in the example above, you can style it like this so that the paragraphs are blue.


p {
color: blue;
}


One very interesting thing about CSS is that it can be written inside an HTML file, using style as a < style > element or as an attribute of some other <p style =””> element. It can also be written in a separate CSS-only file by importing it into the HTML document as follows:


<link rel =" stylesheet " href ="css_file_name.css">


It is important to point out that there is the possibility of using more than one CSS file at the same time, to style the application. Hence the word “cascade”. This allows for several different interactions, but care must be taken not to get lost and make the code confusing, always following the rules for this.


CSS3

CSS has always been an extraordinary tool, with which countless projects can be carried out easily, quickly, and efficiently. This new version, CSS3, is even simpler and has been very well accepted by web developers.

Below we list the main changes in CSS3:

- CSS3 is compatible with older versions of the language, that is, designers do not need to abandon the work they did with versions prior to CSS3. This new language can be reworked into old modules as well. However, there may be some speed issues during conversion.

- CSS3 is made up of small modules that make the application easier and simpler to use. Selectors, colors, backgrounds, borders, text effects and 2D or 3D transformations are some of the most useful modules that CSS3 offers.

- CSS3, being independent, loads much faster than its precursors. It is very compatible with all available browsers. The individual modules also help to save a lot of time during development, implementation, and end of production.


CONCLUSION

With the use of HTML5 and CSS3, companies are increasingly developing and expanding web content and applications with the purpose of creating well-defined and accurate pages and systems that can be accessed on different devices, browsers, and operating systems.

Therefore, knowing these two languages in depth will make you stand out in the job market. Not to mention that with them you save time, make your code shorter and reduce the chances of errors.

If you were in doubt whether it would be worth studying these two languages, you can play for sure you won't regret it.


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Programming Paradigms

Programming Paradigms

(13 minutes of reading)


It is very common to mix programming paradigms with programming languages, although we are talking about different things, there are some similarities between them.

Programming languages are used to “teach” computers to do different tasks and actions. Languages also have their own vocabularies and grammar rules for developing these instructions.

Paradigms are a type of identity of these languages, that is, they are code writing models that can be applied to several languages. It is even possible to use more than one paradigm for the same solution in a previously chosen language.

Paradigms are code-writing templates that can be applied to multiple languages if those languages support it. It is possible to apply more than one paradigm to the same solution in a previously chosen language.

In short, paradigms allow you to solve a problem with different solutions, but each resource will require different efforts and ways of logically thinking about solving this same problem, using different methodologies to achieve the same goal.

Are you curious about it? In today's text we will talk about which language paradigms are most used today. Come read!


PROGRAMMING PARADIGM: WHAT IS IT?

A paradigm is a programming style, a methodology. It's not a programming language, it's the way you solve problems using certain code. There are many well-known programming languages, but they all need to follow some rules when implemented. And these rules are the paradigms, that is, a mean of qualifying the language based on its functionality.

Paradigms can be understood as a programming style, model, or methodology, which point to the best way to solve problems using a given language.

Likewise, when a new programming language is developed, it tends to fit into a paradigm or even into more than one, depending on its peculiarities.


THE IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING ABOUT PROGRAMMING PARADIGMS

Programming paradigms help build more readable and organized codes. In addition, they offer the most appropriate techniques for each type of application, increasing the daily productivity of the developer. Being able to understand languages more broadly and even understand between the lines of codes.

In programming, each problem can have several solutions, so we say that there is more than one paradigm to solve them. Thus, a paradigm may be more advantageous than another, depending on the development of a given system, offering appropriate techniques for a specific application.

By choosing a suitable paradigm for your project, it is possible for applications to be developed with greater productivity, enabling uniqueness in the guidance of code writing among the team members, making it more readable and facilitating maintenance throughout its existence.

Understanding about programming paradigms will make you and the project more professional and organized. In this way, before reflecting on the solution of a problem, you will think about the modeling of that solution and about the paradigm to be used.


WHAT ARE THE MAIN PARADIGMS?

There are six main types of paradigms, each of which was created to fulfill different purposes in web development and, therefore, with pros and cons. Depending on the programming language used, you can use more than one.

The main programming paradigms basically belong to two groups: imperative and declarative. Below we list the main ones:


IMPERATIVE PARADIGM

The imperative paradigm, also known as the procedural paradigm, aims at executing and/or solving a problem. In this type of construction, the instructions must be passed to the computer in the sequence in which they must be executed, where the programmer describes a detailed step by step of what must be fulfilled by the computer.

In the imperative paradigm, the problem solution will be very dependent on the experience and creativity of those who work with programming, that is, the focus of the resolution will be on “how” it should be done.

It is an efficient paradigm and allows modeling just like the real world, in addition to being well established and flexible. On the other hand, the generated source code is difficult to read.

Because it is a relatively complex paradigm, it is not recommended for building applications that require short-term maintenance or very frequent changes.

In general, this paradigm determines that the instructions to be passed to the computer can be grouped into procedures, which, in turn, aim at reusing the code at different points.

Most programming languages taught in colleges are procedural, such as: C, C++, Java, Pascal.

In general, languages that fall into the imperative category are best suited for use in the following situations:

- Existence of a complex operation that includes dependencies between operations and when there is a need for clear visibility of the different states of the application;

- Very unique program and few elements were shared;

- Static program and not expected to change much over time.


OBJECT-ORIENTED PARADIGM

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is among the most popular programming paradigms in the world.

This is mainly due to numerous benefits such as code modularity and the ability to directly associate real issues in terms of code. With the aim of facilitating the development of web applications, this was the first paradigm to allow cross-platform programming.

With the object-oriented paradigm, it is not necessary to create an application differently according to the operating system where it will run, that is, websites, applications and software are developed only once and are interpreted by different platforms without obstacles. That's because, the program is written as a collection of classes and objects for good communication. The smallest and basic entity is object, and all kind of calculations are performed only on objects.

The object-oriented paradigm is used by the following languages: Python, C++, Java, PHP, and Ruby.

Its use is mainly indicated when several programmers work together and do not need to understand everything about each component, there is a lot of code to be shared and reused, or when many changes are foreseen in the project.

One of the major concerns of OOP is to highlight what is important. Not by chance, it emerged with the aim of allowing more agile development of programs, with greater reliability and cost reduction.


EVENT-DRIVEN PARADIGMS

Event-driven paradigms are used by programming languages that use graphical resources, such as games and forms, and depend on a previous user action to perform a movement.

Thus, program execution occurs as certain events are triggered. Therefore, whoever uses it is responsible for when the program is executed.

The main programming languages that use this paradigm are: Visual Basic and Delphi.


DECLARATIVE PROGRAMMING PARADIGMS

Declarative programming paradigms tell the machine what it wants to get, but not the process to get it.

It takes this name because, by using it, the programmer declares immutable logical truths for which the results will always be the same after their interactions.

In other words, declarative paradigms focus more on “what” needs to be solved and not on “how” to do it.

Among the main advantages associated with this category are the ease of accessing the database and the higher level of code abstraction.

Also, programs made with a declarative language are often smaller, as less code is needed to accomplish a goal.

The level of abstraction here is much higher and the main declarative languages are also markup languages: HTML, XML, XSLT and XAML.

In the group of declarative programming paradigms are: functional paradigm and logical paradigm.


FUNCTIONAL PARADIGM

Considered one of the most famous derivations of the declarative paradigm, the functional paradigm gets its name because it is based on the use of mathematical functions.

The functional paradigm is the one that emphasizes the use of functions where the problem is divided into blocks and, for its resolution, assignments are implemented that define variables in their scope that may or may not return results.

As previously stated, it is indicated when the required solution depends on a mathematical basis. Thus, the proposed problem is subdivided, and the implemented functions will do the mathematical calculations. Therefore, the functional paradigm is highly recommended in cases where there is mathematics directly involved in programming.

In this case, the program is made up of short functions, where all the code is inside one function, and all variables are scoped to the function.

In the functional programming paradigm, functions do not modify any values outside the scope of that function, and functions themselves are not affected by any values outside the scope of that function.

The main programming languages that use this paradigm are Haskell, Scala, Racket, and JavaScript.


LOGICAL PARADIGM

The logical paradigm, also known as restrictive, is derived from the declarative paradigm, it is not composed of instructions and, therefore, differs greatly from the other paradigms. Very popular in the Artificial Intelligence sector for obtaining results through logical-mathematical analysis, it uses forms of symbolic logic as input and output patterns. From there, it makes inferences to produce the results. The main elements of this paradigm are: propositions, inference and search rules.

It's based on facts and uses everything it knows to create a scenario where all those facts and clauses are true and point to some ending.

Among the programming languages that use this paradigm are: QLISP, Mercury, Prolog, Absys, Ciao, Alice.

In addition to the paradigms already mentioned here in the text, we cannot fail to mention parallel computing, which is a way of solving problems where several computers work simultaneously to reach the same goal, allowing many processors to execute a program in less time, splitting them. This solution often requires a higher work effort, so they can be more robust applications that serve many users.

This approach is generally recommended when you have a system that has more than one CPU or multi-core processors, or you need to resolve computational issues that can take up to days to resolve.

Languages that support the parallel processing approach are C and C++.


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HTML5

HTML5

(8 minutes of reading)


HTML5 is the new version of HTML. But before we talk about this new version, let's talk a little about the history of HTML?


HTML

With the emergence of the internet, it was necessary to create a language that could be understood by different access points. Thus, Tim Berners-Lee developed HTML. In the 1990s, when the browser developed by Marc Andreessen, Mosaic, became popular, HTML gained strength and was adopted by other developers and browser manufacturers, sharing the same conventions.

HTML is an abbreviation of Hypertext Markup Language, it is the language used for publishing content (text, images, videos, audio, etc.) on the web.

HTML is based on the concept of hypertext, that is, sets of elements connected by connections, which can be words, images, videos, audio, documents, etc. that when connected, form a large information network. The connection made in a hypertext is something unforeseen that allows the communication of data, organizing knowledge and storing related information.

Between 1993 and 1995, new versions appeared (HTML+, HTML 2.0, HTML 3.0) where several changes were proposed to enrich the possibilities of the language, but it was still not treated as a standard. Only in 1997, the W3C working group, worked on version 3.2, causing it to be treated as common practice.

In 2004, the WHATWG (Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group) was founded by developers from companies such as Mozilla, Apple, and Opera, where the work of writing the new version of HTML, HTML5, began.


HTML5 – WHAT IS IT?

As stated at the beginning of the text, HTML5 is the new version of HTML.

HTML5 is a hypertext markup language that presents and structures web content, and this new standard is for HTML, XHTML, and HTML Dom.

HTML 5 allows adding new elements and functions, such as video and audio tags and canvas elements. And its main objective is to facilitate the manipulation of its elements, making it possible to modify the characteristics of objects in a non-intrusive way, making this explicit for the end user.

If we compare HTML5 with its predecessors, we notice that it has a series of additional features, such as:

1) Support for offline media storage;

2) Element of more specific contents, such as footer, header, navigation;

3) Simpler doctype;

4) Audio and video embedding support.

Another interesting feature of HTML5 is that it provides tools for CSS, Cascading Style Sheets, (to know more about CSS read our article), and JavaScript (read our text to know more about JS) do their job in the best possible way, so the site manages to be light and functional.

In addition to the code in HTML5 being written differently, the organization of the page is also different. It became more semantic and with less code, increasing interactivity without the need to install plug-ins that often-caused loss of performance. The code has already become interpolable, that is, it is ready for future devices, facilitating the reuse of information in different ways.


HTML5 STRUCTURES

The basic structure of HTML was maintained in HTML5, the only change was in the doctype.

The purpose of HTML5 is to improve the web experience for its end users as well as the devs. Its greatest quality is that it now has high-level audio and video support, which did not exist in previous versions.

Now we list other differences between HTML and HTML5 versions.

1) SVG (scalabel vector graphics) – canvas and other vector graphics are supported in HTML5, while in HTML the use of vector graphics was only possible if used in conjunction with different technologies, such as: Flash, VML, Silverlight, etc.

2) HTML5 uses application cached web SQL database for temporary storage of data, meanwhile, HTML only uses browser cache.

3) HTML5 is not based on SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language), allowing it to have improved parsing rules, which provide better compatibility.

4) In HTML5, MathML inline and SVG can be used in text, this was not possible in HTML.

5) Some elements that were left out in HTML5 are: isindex, noframes, acronym, applet, basefont, dir, font, frame, frameset, big, center, strike and tt.

6) HTML5 supports new types of form controls like dates and times, email, number, range, TEL, URL, search, etc.


NEW ELEMENTS IN HTML5

Many elements of version 4.0.1 were deleted in version 5, some because they were never used, others because they were obsolete and, still, those that were used improperly. The new version brings innovations that provide the user with a better structure, design, and multimedia content.

The new features in version 5 are directly linked to the need for independent support for new multimedia content formats, new semantic features, and accessibility.

Among them we highlight the following:

1) Inclusion of the canvas that allows you to draw graphics on a web page. In the previous version, this task was performed using external plugins. With this, it is possible, via JavaScript, to control all pixels, in addition to drawing various graphic elements, such as circle, rectangle, ellipse, line, text, images, etc.

2) Inclusion of video and audio elements for multimedia playback. So once again there is integration of external plugins. With this inclusion of tags, HTML5 supports audio and video playback without the need to use external mechanisms.

3) Better support for local storage, HTML5 offers two new objects for storing data locally: SessionStorage, which stores data during an active session, and LocalStorage, which stores data without a time limit.

4) Inclusion of new elements of specific content, since many elements of version 4.0.1 were excluded from the new version, which brings new elements.

5) Inclusion of new form controls to make life easier for devs, unlike version 4.0.1, which had a scarce amount of form controls. Only the input element remained, but it gained new values for the type attribute, allowing greater control over data entry by the user.

6) Full CSS3 support. With this integration, web pages can receive the most varied types of styles such as shadows in texts and frames, transition effects, frame with rounded corners and several new features that CSS3 offers.


CONCLUSION

As previously mentioned, HTML5 comes with many new features, from video and audio incorporation to the use of the canvas element. The markup language also offers multiple new elements, bringing better compatibility with improved parsing rules.

Therefore, it is essential that programmers learn about HTML5 as soon as possible so that they can maximize the potential of modern browsers.


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Internet Day

Internet Day

(5 minutes of reading time)


On May 17th the Internet Day is celebrated! The date was established by the United Nations (UN) in January 2006. On that occasion, it was also established that the day of Telecommunications would be celebrated.

Today, during the digital world, how would we be our lives without the internet? You can't even imagine, can you?

Can you imagine having to go to the bank every time you need to make a payment? Or go to the supermarket every time you run out of milk?

The internet has changed our lives, it has changed the way people interact, study, shop, play games, watch movies, listen to music and do business. The world, since the internet arrived, has never been (and won’t be) the same.


THE HISTORY OF THE INTERNET

The internet was created in the United States in 1969. Initially called Arpanet, its purpose was to connect research laboratories. That year, a professor at the University of California sent to a friend of him at Stanford the first e-mail in history.

Arpanet belonged to the US Department of Defense. At that time, the Cold War was going on and the network ensured communication between the military and scientists even in case of war.

In 1982, Arpanet began to be used in the North American academic world and then expanded to other countries, such as the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden. And so, the name was changed to internet.

It was only in 1987 that the internet left the academic environment, and its commercial use was allowed in the USA.

In 1992, several companies providing Internet access began to emerge in the USA. And the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) invented the World Wide Web, which began to be used to put information within the reach of any internet user.

In Brazil, the use was released in 1995, however, some universities such as the federal universities of Rio Grande do Sul and Rio de Janeiro were already connected to the network since 1989.


THE INTERNET NOWADAYS

Today, 30 years after its popularization, the internet is used for work, study, business, and entertainment.

Today, we can do anything with a click. We buy clothes, food, work, study, socialize, make medical appointments, bank transactions and much more using a computer or cell phone screen.

With the COVID-19 pandemic there has been a significant increase in internet usage in the world. However, recent research shows that more than a third of the world's population does not have an internet connection.

A report by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) published in 2021 found that 2.9 billion people (37% of the world's population) do not connect to the network. Among them, 96% live in developing countries.

According to the ITU Secretary-General, Houlin Zhao, one of the main challenges to bring the internet to these people without access is to reach the rural areas of these developing countries, where access in urban areas reaches an average of 72% of people and only to 34% of the rural population. 

On top of that, there are also problems such as poverty, access to electricity or lack of digital knowledge. These are just some of the challenges for the "digitally excluded", according to the ITU.


THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET

With the arrival of 5G its known that the internet will evolve even further. In addition to faster download speeds, 5G will facilitate the implementation and adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT), considerably leveraging digital communication for various industrial sectors and companies. 

One of the most attractive points for the use of 5G is the benefits for different areas, such as telemedicine, education, agriculture, and transportation.

Thus, with this new technology, we will have a new technological scenario that will open several possibilities in practically all segments of the economy, making it possible to create new products and services that will have a significant impact on our daily lives and business.


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Reference:
https://bit.ly/3O6m7lv
https://bit.ly/3xmWMOf
https://bit.ly/3xibqGJ
https://bit.ly/3jxhTW1
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